“When you find yourself drowning in self-hate, you have to remind yourself that you weren’t born feeling this way. That at some point in your journey, some person or experience sent you the message that there was something wrong with who you are, and you internalized those messages and took them on as your truth. But that hate isn’t yours to carry, and those judgments aren’t about you. And in the same way that you learned to think badly of yourself, you can learn to think new, self-loving and accepting thoughts. You can learn to challenge those beliefs, take away their power, and reclaim your own. It won’t be easy, and it won’t happen over night. But it is possible. And it starts when you decide that there has to be more to life than this pain you feel. It starts when you decide that you deserve to discover it.”
Daniell Koepke (via wocrecovery.tumblr.com)

“Say NO to paying for something that happened 100s of years ago,” screamed one meme that was doing the rounds on social media around the time tabloids began to claim that Caribbean nations were “suing” for reparations. They aren’t, strictly speaking, and nor can something which ended only in 1838 be compared, as it often is, with the Viking invasions or Roman conquest. The CARICOM group of nations, led by Barbados , is really calling for a wider dialogue about historical justice. Why should Britain – or any other former slave-trading nation – shy away from it?

After all, in almost any other sphere, historical continuities are acknowledged, even venerated – aren’t we told ad nauseum that the monarchy is important because it represents continuity? Even something like the “Commonwealth” – whose Games will be held in Glasgow this summer – celebrates the international “links” forged by Britain’s Empire and its apparent historical achievements. Britons are constantly reminded by politicians and some historians to take pride in having “given” former colonies those two old chestnuts, the railways and the English language. Seems a bit odd, if not thoroughly hypocritical, to then swiftly put distance between our “proud” present and the Empire’s rather less flattering legacies, which include gargantuan impoverishment and dislocation across swathes of the globe. How is it possible to keep up the endless national self-congratulation for the abolition of the slave trade while insisting that no one today has any connection to slavery itself?

Priyamvada Gopal for the New Statesman | brilliant piece on reparations that really opens out the discussion (via derica)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Filipino activists kick off internationally coordinated protests vs Obama Asia trip

April 23 - On the day United States President Barack Obama is set to arrive in Japan on the first leg of his East Asia tour, activists under the Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (New Patriotic Alliance) marched to the US embassy in Manila to denounce what they called the “US imperialist agenda in Asia”. The groups clashed with police who were guarding the US embassy. Police used a water cannon against the protesters.

“The US pivot to Asia combines military rebalancing and free trade agreements like the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement. The US seeks to maintain its dominance in the region by violating the national sovereignty and plundering the economies of their  so-called ‘allies’. The people of Asia stand to gain nothing from the Obama visit and the US agenda he carries,” said Bayan secretary general Renato M. Reyes, Jr.

Bayan is coordinating with various anti-bases and anti-globalization groups in Japan, South Korea and the United States for a series of protests against the US pivot and the TPPA. Apart from the April 23 protest in Manila, anti-bases and anti-war groups in Japan such as the Asia-Wide Campaign are set to hold protests in time for the US-Japan Summit on April 24. Groups in South Korea are also expected to hold protests against US military bases in the Korean peninsula and the continued implementation of the US-Korea Free Trade Agreement and the promotion of the TPPA. Bayan-USA will join Japanese and Korean activists in the US for coordinated actions in the afternoon of April 25 in Los Angeles, Seattle, New York and San Francisco. Filipino migrants are expected to hold protest actions on April 27.

justplainsomething asked: Do you know of any ancient cultures outside of Roman and Greek (and not European obviously) with myths about humans becoming immortal? I'm trying to do character building for a story about immortals in the modern world and I want to have as much diversity as possible (aka NOT just Romans and Greeks), but I haven't found much yet and also don't want to bend other cultures' myths to fit my ideas, either. Anyway, I think your blog is great and thanks for the help.

medievalpoc:

ferenginar:

medievalpoc:

Immortality and the origin of death is one of the most popular topics of stories from around the world, actually. Often immortality is or can be conferred on average humans by eating or drinking a rare and special kind of food or beverage.

In the Islamic world you have the four immortals, including Khidir, the Green Man, who drank from the water of life and became immortal. Khidir’s tale shares some factors in common with the story of The Wandering Jew. You can read more about him and the other immortals here.

In China you have the Covert Eight Immortals:

whose power can be transferred to tools an used to destroy evil ro bestow life; as well as the Eight Immortal Scholars of Huainan, or the Eight Gentlemen, who aren’t deified or made supernatural in any way, as their “immortality” is a metaphor but I think that’s a fun play for fiction. As well as Emperor Qin Shi Huang, who famously spent much of his life searching for an elixir of immortality.

There are a fair amount of Native American tales that deal with this topic, too. The Boy Who Would Be Immortal is a Hočąk story, with analogues in Macmac, Menominee, and Potawotami, with their theme of fasting. If you plan to include immortals that blend with supernatural tales, Wendigo are certainly immortal (humans become Wendigo by breaking taboos or committing terrible crimes), as are Skin Walkers in Navajo legend.

In Vietnam, Hang Nga and Hau Nghe are made immortal by eating a special type of grass. Separate from this, you have the Vietnamese Four Immortals: the giant boy Thánh Gióng, mountain god Tản Viên Sơn Thánh,Chử Đồng Tử the marsh boy, and the princess Liễu Hạnh.

In both Hindu and Buddhist tales, the elixir of immortality is guarded jealously by the gods and Garuda, the mythological bird person, plays a very important role in these kind of stories in Southeast Asia.

Another linking theme is the Tree of Life, which many cultures have in common, from Yggdrasil to the Mesoamerican World Tree.

There’s a Yoruban tale about Oba Koso or Shango, who was forced to commit suicide by political intrigue but did not hang; The demigod Maui has many stories his quests involving immortality for himself and others in Tonga, New Zealand, Samoa, and many other Pacific Islands.

Also keep in mind, even if you’re going to allow Greek or Roman immortals to dominate your story-not all Greek or Roman immortals were white people. A notable exception is Memnon, an African (Ethiopian and/or Sudanese) king, who was killed by Achilles and mourned so deeply by Eos, his mother, that Zeus was moved to grant him immortality.

I highly encourage anyone else to add their favorite stories about immortality to this post!!!

I can think of a Palestinian Jew who proved immortal in the folk literature of the time.

Isa, or Jesus, is included in the literature on the four Islamic Immortals above. You gotta click the links!

jimhines:

bookoisseur:

themysciranqueen:

Steve Rude’s Wonder Woman <3

These are amazing. I had never seen Wonder Woman like this until perpetua tweeted. H/T my friend!

What would it take to make Superheroes With Kittens a thing?

defending hunting and meat eating, as a vegetarian

yuite-dio:

In reference to that post about the Inuit seal hunter who was protesting Ellen DeGeneres’s fundraiser to stop seal hunting, here are some of my opinions. They are pretty scattered and rambly and this post doesn’t cover even half of my arguments on this topic. But I wanted to put this down somewhere, I guess.

Read More

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!

Leo and Diane Dillon

Various Illustrations

Leo and Diane Dillon were one of the greatest illustration teams in the history of Fantasy Art. Books that have used their illustrations for cover or inside art include an edition of the Narnia books, Garth Nix’s Sabriel, Lirael and Abhorsen, Her Stories and The Girl Who Spun Gold by Virginia Hamilton, The Earthsea Trilogy by Ursula K. LeGuin, Aida by Leontyne Price, The Girl Who Dreamed Only Geese by Howard A. Norman, and many, many more.

There is a blog dedicated to archiving their work here.

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

Art Smith, African American Jewelry Designer

Mr. Smith earned his degree in 1940, and instantly began taking jewelry making classes at NYU.  He would take classes at night and work for Winifred Mason, an up and coming jewelry designer from Haiti.  It was here that he learned how to transform metal and copper into such artistic pieces that women from NY to LA would love to wear.  

In 1946, he opened his first shop on Cornelia Street in Greenwich Village.  Soon after he relocated to 140 West Fourth and that move was his best move.  Not only was he selling his pieces from his own store front; he was selling to boutiques in Boston, Chicago and San Francisco.  His biggest clients however, were Bloomingdales and Milton Heffing in Manhattan.

Mr. Smith was experiencing huge success.  By the 1950′s, his unique jewelry pieces were featured in Harper’s Bazaar, Vogue and The New Yorker.  In the New Yorker he was mentioned in their shoppers guide “On The Avenue.”  After that feature he ran a small ad in The New Yorker for several years.  These advertisement and press coverage gave him prestige amongst notable actors, singers and dancers.

In 1960, his notoriety had flourished.  He began using silver more in his growing collection.  But one of his biggest achievements was designing a brooch for Eleanor Roosevelt and designing cuff links for Duke Ellington that included notes from Ellington’s 1930 song “Mood Indigo.”

In 1969, he was recognized with an exhibition at the New York museum of Art and Design (then Museum of Contemporary Crafts).  Art Smith closed his shop in 1979, and died of heart failure in 1982.

MORE

See an obituary here

"I am an Inuit seal meat eater, and my fur is ethical," wrote Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, bundled in a sealskin coat, pants and boots. She also wrote a letter to DeGeneres and posted it online.

Samsung vowed to donate $1 for every retweet of DeGeneres’ celebrity-packed Oscars selfie to a charity of her choice. She raised $1.5 million for the Humane Society of the United States, which campaigns annually against Canada’s seal hunt.

The Ellen DeGeneres Show’s website calls the seal hunt “one of the most atrocious and inhumane acts against animals allowed by any government.”

The Inuit have long defended the hunt as a sustainable practice, deeply rooted in Inuit culture, which helps feed people in a region plagued by hunger.

"The meat feeds families, which is important to an area where many households have identified that they face issues of food insecurity," said Sandi Vincent, who posted her own sealfie Thursday.

The pelts also come in handy in the cold northern climate and provide a needed source of income, she said. She also countered the idea of the hunt as “inhumane.”

"In Inuit culture, it is believed seals and other animals have souls and offer themselves to you. Humanely and with gratitude we accepted this gift," she said, reminiscing about catching her first seal at age 15.

highkeygay:

OHMYGOD

highkeygay:

OH
MY
GOD

(Source: saemiligr)

lichtenstrange:

prenons:

Prince George receives a giant stuffed wombat from Australia’s Governor General. 
In other news, George and the Wombat sounds like an excellent new children’s book series.


oops

lichtenstrange:

prenons:

Prince George receives a giant stuffed wombat from Australia’s Governor General. 

In other news, George and the Wombat sounds like an excellent new children’s book series.

image

oops